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Liberalism and radicalism in Argentina

Topics: Politics of Argentina


This article gives an overview of liberal and radical parties in Argentina. It is limited to liberal and radical parties with substantial support, mainly proved by having had a representation in parliament. The sign means a reference to another party in that scheme. Parties included in this scheme do not necessarily label themselves as a liberal party.

Introduction

In the nineteenth century Argentine liberalism organized itself as opposition to the ruling conservative forces. After it had become part of the ruling oligarchy, democratic liberals formed a second and long lasting tradition, named the Radical Civic Union (Union Civica Radical). This party later aligned itself with the Socialist International. Nowadays it more or less adheres to a synthesis of liberal and social democratic ideas. The party Recreate for Growth (Recrear para el Crecimiento) seems to be an attempt to form a market liberal party. Some provincial conservative parties use the label liberal. The Union of Democratic Center (Union del Centro Democratico) considers itself to be a liberal party, others see it as a conservative party. Both parties are not included in the timeline below.

The timeline

From Liberal Party until Autonomist Nationalist Party

1852: Liberals formed the Liberal Party (Partido Liberal)

1865: The party fell apart into the Autonomist Liberal Party (Partido Liberal Autonomista) and the Nationalist Liberal Party

1878: The PLA is more or less continued by the Autonomist Party of Buenos Aires (Partido Autonomista de Buenos Aires)

1879: The PABA merged with the Republican Party into the Autonomist Nationalist Party (Partido Nacionalista Autonomista), which disappeared shortly after. Some of their members became active in the Civic Union

Nationalist Liberal Party / Republican Party

1865: The Liberal Party fell apart into the Autonomist Liberal Party and the Nationalist Liberal Party (Partido Liberal Nacionalista)

1870: The PLN merged into the Republican Party (Partido Republicano)

1879: The party merged into the Autonomist Nationalist Party

Radical Civic Union

1890: Liberals, partly originating from the Autonomist Nationalist Party united with the Civic Youth Union (Union Civica de la Juventud) into the Civic Union (Union Civica)

1890: The Civic Union merged into the Radical Civic Union (Union Civica Radical) and the unsuccessful National Civic Union

1928: The party became the Personalist Radical Civic Union (Union Civica Radical Personalista) and the Antipersonalist Radical Civic Union

1943: Both parties re-united as the Radical Civic Union (Union Civica Radical)

1956: The UCR merged into the Radical Civic Union of the People (Union Civica Radical del Pueblo) and the Intransigent Radical Civic Union

1970: The UCRP is renamed into the present-day Radical Civic Union (Union Civica Radical)

National Civic Union

1890: A faction of the Civic Union formed the National Civic Union (Union Civica Nacional), but failed

Antipersonalist Radical Civic Union

1928: The Radical Civic Union felt apart into the Personalist Radical Civic Union and the Antipersonalist Radical Civic Union (Union Civica Radical Antipersonalista)

1943: Both parties re-united into the Radical Civic Union

Intransigent Radical Civic Union

1956: The Radical Civic Union split into the Radical Civic Union of the People and the Intransigent Radical Civic Union (Union Civica Radical Intransigente)

1963: A faction formed the Intransigent Party (Partido Intransingente), with left-wing leanings.

1972: The party is reorganized into the Integration and Development Movement (Movimiento de Integracion y Desarrollo)

Liberal and radical leaders

Marcelo Torcuato de Alvear - Hipolito Irigoyen - Arturo Umberto Illia - Raul Alfonsin

See also

History of Argentina

Politics of Argentina

List of political parties in Argentina

This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article Liberalism and radicalism in Argentina